5 Books On My Christmas Wishlist

5 Books On My Christmas Wishlist

Books on my christmas wishlist - books for boys 15+I look back over my year of reading and my #52booksin52weeks was a bit of a washout.

I was reading, just not as much or as often as I would have liked.

I also blogged less often, but thankfully my brother Book Boy Jr (12) stepped into the gap (you can see his Christmas wishlist later this week).

My wishlist this year, it turns out, is all non-fiction of one type or another, with a strong music theme and a few familiar faces.

I hope you all have a lovely festive season.

 

Unreliable Memoirs

By Clive James

I hadn’t heard much about Clive James before his recent death, but from what I saw in documentaries and interviews he seemed like a very clever, entertaining man. Many people have described this as one of the funniest books they have ever read. I look forward to reading more about him.

 

Love is as Strong as Death: Poems chosen by Paul Kelly

By Paul Kelly

I’m interested to read the literary influences of this prolific songwriter.

 

Year of the Monkey

By Patti Smith

Another chapter of Smith’s memoir, this time detailing her 70th year. I really enjoyed ‘Just Kids‘ when I read it earlier this year.

 

Bowie’s Bookshelf: The Hundred Books That Changed David Bowie’s Life

By John O’Connell

I really like David Bowie’s music and this book, which looks at the 100 books that changed Bowie’s life in a series of essays that studies where they fit into his music, would be very interesting.

 

Adam Spencer’s Numberland

By Adam Spencer

I’m a big fan of Adam Spencer and look forward to reading his newest title.

 

Click the title to read more about the book and to purchase from Booktopia.

Book review: The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

Book review: The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

Book review: The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

This book review of The Crossover is brought to you by Book Boy Jr (12).

Title: The Crossover

Author: Kwame Alexander

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

About the book: This book is a blend of hip-hop poetry and normal text. It follows the story of JB, a young basketball talent, who is progressing in his sports career when an unfortunate mishap causes his father to be hospitalised. It only makes him work harder.

What I thought: I really liked this book. I borrowed it from the school library during reading time and couldn’t put it down. I ended up taking it home to read, and it was here that I found out how much I really loved the book.

The hip hop-style poetry really keeps it flowing and exciting and my love of basketball really fuelled it for me as well. It was a good story.

I recommend this book for anyone from 9+ just because some of the words are harder to understand and it deals with some pretty grown-up things towards the end.

Buy The Crossover on Booktopia.

Book review: Holes by Louis Sachar

Book review: Holes by Louis Sachar

Book review: Holes by Louis Sachar

This book review of Holes is by my little brother Book Boy Jr (12).

Title: Holes

Author: Louis Sachar

Publisher: Bloomsbury

About the book: This book follows the story of Stanley Yelnats, who has been cursed by his pig-stealing great-great-grandfather and has been sent to Camp Green Lake where he is doomed to dig holes for eternity. After meeting a friend and running away, Stanley starts to explore his true family story.

What I thought: I really loved this book. For me, there was something about reading about people digging holes that was really exciting. I also liked the fact that Stanley had to find a way to be accepted into the group at Camp Green Lake to survive.

The characters in the story were all really interesting, and I liked the mystery as to why they had to dig the holes. They’re told it’s to build character but there’s more to it.

I like books, like Holes, that feel ‘real’. I would recommend this book for readers 8-14.

Buy this book at Booktopia.

Book review: JT: The Making Of A Total Legend by Johnathan Thurston

Book review: JT: The Making Of A Total Legend by Johnathan Thurston

JT: The Making Of A Total Legend by Johnathan ThurstonTitle: JT: The Making Of A Total Legend

Author: Johnathan Thurston with James Phelps

Publisher: HarperCollins Children’s Books

About the book: This is the life story of the rugby league Johnathan Thurston. It follows his younger years and upbringing through to where he is today.

The story is written in first-person and includes his ups and downs, and the blood, sweat and tears that made him such a successful footballer.

What I thought: I thought this was a great book, since I love rugby league so much. I loved how we were able to see where it all started and how JT was brought up.

At times he felt as though he would never make it, when he wasn’t picked for any rep sides, but with his hard work and dedication he was able to make it to where he is today.

I would recommend this  book for readers 10+ and to anyone who would like to learn more about rugby league and how big players make it.

Buy JT: The Making Of A Total Legend on Booktopia.

Book review: Squidge Dibley Destroys The School by Mick Elliott

Book review: Squidge Dibley Destroys The School by Mick Elliott

Book review: Squidge Dibley destroys the school by Mick Elliott | bookboy.com.auThis review is brought to you by my brother Book Boy Jr (12.)

Title: Squidge Dibley

Author: Mick Elliott

Publisher: Hachette Australia
About the book: This book is about a grade-six boy whose world is turned upside down when a new teacher arrives – and a new student called Squidge Dibley causes mayhem in the classroom.

Padman O’Donnell tells the story, and it’s full of little illustrations.

Warning: the new teacher, Vice-Principal Hoovesly has many very silly rules.

What I thought: I thought this was very fun for an easy read and it flowed really well. It was a real page-turner and very exciting – I really liked the classroom setting and the different characters in Padman’s class.

I also like the sketchy, doodle style of the illustrations. If you like Diary Of A Wimpy Kid, or New Kid: Unpopular Me, I think you would like this one.

I recommend this book for ages 6-10, as it’s a really easy read.

Buy Squidge Dibley at Booktopia.

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