Oat, LSA and chia biscuits (olsac biscuits are a thing)

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Chia biscuits for the lunchbox

In my mind, these chia biscuits are known as Olsac bickies. If linseed, sunflower seeds and almonds can get an LSA moniker, then surely my chia biscuits can be called Olsacs.

Whatever we call them (and, let’s face it, Olsac is never going to be a thing), these oat chia biscuits are packed full of good stuff. There’s the oats, the LSA, the chia, but also coconut, buckwheat and, sure, a little bit of sugar helps the biscuit go down.

I added an egg to bind the biscuits well, but if you need to go egg-free, the chia is really enough to hold it all together.

Another good thing about the egg thing is that without it, these chia biscuits can be made straight from pantry ingredients. They are a favourite in our lunchboxes – if they ever last that long. A batch is gone before the sunsets around here!

More biscuits to try:

Oat, LSA and chia biscuits

Chia biscuits

Takes 15 minutes (plus 10 minutes resting time)
Bakes 15 minutes
Makes 12 biscuits

1 ½ cups rolled oats or quick oats
¾ cup buckwheat flour (spelt or wholemeal wheat flour also good)
½ cup LSA
¾ cup coconut sugar (brown or rapadura works well)
½ cup coconut, desiccated or shredded
3 tablespoons chia seeds
½ teaspoon baking powder
Generous pinch of salt
¼ cup melted coconut oil or unsalted butter
4 tablespoons of water
1 free-range egg (if using, see notes), lightly beaten
6 squares of good-quality dark chocolate (at least 70% cocoa), melted

Preheat oven to 180ºC and line two baking trays with baking paper or reusable silicone mats.

If you are using rolled oats, blitz in a food processor until fine, but still textured. Mix with the buckwheat, LSA, sugar, coconut and chia seeds, baking powder and salt in a mixing bowl.

Mix together the melted butter or coconut oil with the water.

Add the wet ingredients plus the beaten egg to the dry ingredients and stir well to combine. Leave the mix to rest for about 10 minutes.

Roll the mixture into golfball-size balls (approx 50 gm per ball) and place 2cm apart on baking trays. Flatten the balls with your hand and reshape the edges so they are neat.

Bake for about 15 minutes (a little longer may be needed) until golden. Allow to cool completely on the baking tray, before drizzling the melted dark chocolate over the top. Put into the fridge to set the chocolate.

Will keep for about one week in an airtight jar in the pantry, or freeze for up to one month.

Notes

You can make these biscuits egg-free by omitting the egg. They will still bind together thanks to the chia, though they will be more crumbly.

Feel free to omit the dark chocolate if you like – they are still delicious without it.

Reckon you’ll give these chia biscuits a go?

Healthy oat chia biscuits to make

 

Written by Bron Maxabella

Bron is the founder of Mumlyfe and is so happy to welcome you here. Bron has been writing in the Australian parenting space as Maxabella for more than seven years and is mum to three mostly happy kids and wife to one mostly happy husband. Mostly happy is a win, right?

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